Creating An Effective Essay On Why Homework Is Harmful

The task of creating an effective essay on why homework is harmful might seem straight forward. However, you might end up writing a poor paper if you fail to understand the purpose of such an essay topic. Simply put, such kind of a topic requires you to develop an argumentative or persuasive paper that supports the position that has already been taken in the topic.

Planning the Essay

The first important thing you need to do at the planning stage is to analyze your reader or audience and decide if the audience agrees with the position, is neutral, or disagrees with the position. Another important thing at the planning stage is conducting research on the topic in order provide specific as well as convincing evidence. Additionally, you need to plan for the structure of your paper by figuring out the evidence that will be included and the order in which it shall be presented.

The Introduction

You should ensure that your introduction has a ‘grabber or hook’ to capture the reader’s attention. There are several ways to achieve this. You can open with an unusual detail or a powerful statement. For instance, you can begin by stating that homework is the number one cause of stress among students in school. Other ways to capture the reader’s attention include, opening with a relevant quotation, opening with a fact or statistic, opening with an interesting anecdote, opening with a rhetorical question, and opening with an outrageous statement or an exaggeration. Moreover, the introduction should also include a thesis statement that will act as the foundation of the entire discussion in the paper.

The Body

In the body section, you should provide evidence that supports the opinion presented in the thesis statement. The body should have a minimum of three paragraphs, and each paragraph should be based on a concrete reason to support the thesis statement. A good argumentative or persuasive writer should also attempt to anticipate some opposing viewpoints and offer counter-arguments alongside the main points in the discussion. To support your argument, use facts (from observation, reading or personal experience), statistics (from reliable sources), quotes (from leading experts), and examples as proof.

The Conclusion

In this section, you should end by providing a summary of the most important details of your argument. You should also state what the reader is supposed to do or believe. In addition, you can write a call for action or a personal comment on the issue.

2017 © BrandineUniversity.org. All rights reserved.